Saturday, October 2, 2010

Craquelin v2.0


Craquelin, the original version, is a Belgian pastry that consists of wrapping sugar cubes (flavored often but not necessarily so) with brioche and then topping the brioche with sanding sugar (see photo all the way at the bottom of this posting for the classic version). For this version we used a cube mold and forced the brioche to proof and bake in it with a flat weight over the mold to take on its shape.




Both images above are a test that my head baker, Justen Nickel, did for us a few days ago in preparation for putting them into production soon. I think it looks great and it also tastes very good. I wouldn't say it is better than the original craquelin; I would put them in the same category taste-wise, but visually, 2.0 is far superior. (Note: the empty spot in the middle of both craquelins is caused by the sugar cubes melting into the dough, leaving a crispy sweet cavern behind).


8 comments:

  1. Chef,

    did you increase the amount of sugar in the second version or is it the same amount as the original (it looks bigger)?

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  2. Did baking it with a weight on it change the crumb or moisture content of the product at all?

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  3. Chris, I'm guessing it's equal amounts.
    Maybe forcing the dough into the mold retarded some expansion...so the "sugary cavern" is smaller?
    Just a thought :)

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  4. Becca,

    I was more comenting on the idea about the perfect craqulin, you should be able to get the flavored sugar in every bite. If the second version is larger I thought that there would need to be more sugar to give the craqulin its ideal eating quality. But I understand what you are saying and it does make sense.

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  5. I like it- essentially a Pullman doughnut, cubed.

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  6. I like where James was going with that- imagine a cubed doughnut... that would require some special frying gear though. Not impossible, but definitely specialized...

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  7. A cube doughnut would look nice but how would you still allow for the texture to be light and airy, while still using a mold that might compress the dough? A square cutter might work but it would not result in a perfect square with 90 degree angles

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  8. Man this makes me want to move back to Belgium again. :::sigh::: Belgians like to put wads of sugar inside pastry... their gauffres are proof of that. I can still imagine the scent of the metro-doors opening and the smell of waffles billowing in to tempt us all out into the station to seek out those golden, lip-searinly hot, sugary delicious waffles. ::::drool::::

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